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25/01/2021- HR/VP blog – Last week, sanctions at the European Commission, we adopted a new strategy to strengthen the international role of the euro and increase our resilience to extraterritorial unilateral. The fields of finance and economics are increasingly used as tools in international competition. We need to enhance EU’s strategic autonomy in these areas.

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Good afternoon,

Well, to be the first meeting of the year, we have had a very though, heavy agenda. Let me run [you] through our discussion.

From growing onions in the sand, beekeeping to preserve wildlife, building homes from plastic bottles, to solar parks and other initiatives to switch to green: such concrete actions, big or small, help to mitigate climate change. Yet there is a need for drastic action. Climate action is at the heart of the European Green Deal – from ambitiously cutting global emissions, to investing in research and innovation, to preserving the natural environment.

The Council today adopted conclusions on ʻClimate and Energy Diplomacy - Delivering on the external dimension of the European Green Dealʼ. In its conclusions the Council recognises that climate change is an existential threat to humanity. It notes that global climate action still falls short of what is required to achieve the long-term goals of the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The European Union (EU) and the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka held their 23rd meeting of the Joint Commission on 25 January 2021, via video conference. This was the first Joint Commission under the new leadership in both the European Union and Sri Lanka.

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Good morning, This is the first Foreign Affairs Council of the year and we are going to have a very dense agenda. I do not know how we are going to do in order to deal with all these issues.

The Coordinated Maritime Presences tool adopted by the Council today will increase the EU’s capacity to act as a reliable partner and maritime security provider.

The Gulf of Guinea is a vast and diverse region stretching from Senegal to Angola, covering approximately 6,000 km of coastline. It is an important shipping zone transporting oil and gas, as well as goods to and from central and southern Africa. On any one day there are around 1,500 fishing vessels, tankers, and cargo ships navigating its waters.
Piracy, armed robbery at sea, kidnapping of seafarers, illegal fishing, smuggling and trafficking, and transnational organised crime pose a major threat to maritime security in the Gulf of Guinea and ultimately to the economic development of the entire region. The EU Maritime Security Strategy Action Plan as well as the EU Gulf of Guinea Strategy and Action Plan frame the EU’s response to these challenges.

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