European Union External Action

Swazi PM, EU Ambassador launch EU-funded sugarcane museum

Also present during the launch were Cabinet Ministers as well as representatives of the sugar industry in the country.

The museum, based at Tambankulu in the east of Swaziland, displays how sugarcane in Swaziland is produced, milled and sold. The state-of-the-art museum blends wall panels and touchscreen computers that inform and entertain visitors. There are also displays on how sugar originated thousands of years ago and then spread worldwide as well as the history of the sugar industry in Swaziland.

Most importantly, the museum panels also show how lives in Swaziland have been transformed through sugarcane farming. The livelihood of smallholder rural farmers is being transformed and uplifted through innovative farmer companies, thanks to EU support to the country's sugar industry over the years.

"This museum is an ideal place for school tours and a must destination for tourists. The EU is very happy and proud to be part of this important project which is a major milestone in the history of sugarcane farming in Swaziland. By supporting such projects the EU aims to contribute meaningfully to Swaziland's development initiatives thus helping the country to achieve sustainable economic growth and prosperity," said EU Ambassador, Nicola Bellomo

Speaking on the same occasion, the Prime Minister said a society is greatly enriched by having extensive knowledge of its own history. He said the development of a society can be best noted by comparing its activities exhibited in the earlier decades and those of the present times.

The PM said throughout history, societies have made a great effort to record events, views and experiences, limited only by techniques of the day.

"The museum is, therefore, one such technique and has proven to be of universal appeal where a person can enjoy an authentic view of what people made, and how they lived and worked," said the PM.

He then thanked the EU for supporting this project which he said will not only showcase the history of sugarcane farming in Swaziland but will also help boost tourism in the country thus helping to improve its economy.

The launch of the museum also coincided with the 50th anniversary of the Swaziland Sugar Association.

The museum complements the EU-funded projects under the National Adaptation Strategy (NAS) for the Sugar Sector in Swaziland which has been financed by the EU to the tune of EUR 120 million from the EU Accompanying Measures for Sugar Protocol Countries instrument.

Over the years, the EU has greatly contributed towards the achievement of the objective of the NAS which is to improve the competitiveness of the sugar industry in Swaziland while reducing poverty in the country

Also present during the launch were Cabinet Ministers as well as representatives of the sugar industry in the country.

The museum, based at Tambankulu in the east of Swaziland, displays how sugarcane in Swaziland is produced, milled and sold. The state-of-the-art museum blends wall panels and touchscreen computers that inform and entertain visitors. There are also displays on how sugar originated thousands of years ago and then spread worldwide as well as the history of the sugar industry in Swaziland.

Most importantly, the museum panels also show how lives in Swaziland have been transformed through sugarcane farming. The livelihood of smallholder rural farmers is being transformed and uplifted through innovative farmer companies, thanks to EU support to the country's sugar industry over the years.

"This museum is an ideal place for school tours and a must destination for tourists. The EU is very happy and proud to be part of this important project which is a major milestone in the history of sugarcane farming in Swaziland. By supporting such projects the EU aims to contribute meaningfully to Swaziland's development initiatives thus helping the country to achieve sustainable economic growth and prosperity," said EU Ambassador, Nicola Bellomo

Speaking on the same occasion, the Prime Minister said a society is greatly enriched by having extensive knowledge of its own history. He said the development of a society can be best noted by comparing its activities exhibited in the earlier decades and those of the present times.

The PM said throughout history, societies have made a great effort to record events, views and experiences, limited only by techniques of the day.

"The museum is, therefore, one such technique and has proven to be of universal appeal where a person can enjoy an authentic view of what people made, and how they lived and worked," said the PM.

He then thanked the EU for supporting this project which he said will not only showcase the history of sugarcane farming in Swaziland but will also help boost tourism in the country thus helping to improve its economy.

The launch of the museum also coincided with the 50th anniversary of the Swaziland Sugar Association. Before the launch, the PM and Ambassador Bellomo were taken on a tour of the museum by the project consultant, Bob Forrester, who spearheaded the establishment of the museum.

The museum complements the EU-funded projects under the National Adaptation Strategy (NAS) for the Sugar Sector in Swaziland which has been financed by the EU to the tune of EUR 120 million from the EU Accompanying Measures for Sugar Protocol Countries instrument.

Over the years, the EU has greatly contributed towards the achievement of the objective of the NAS which is to improve the competitiveness of the sugar industry in Swaziland while reducing poverty in the country

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