European Union External Action

EU support to the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) and the Awareness and Education Programme on the Khmer Rouge regime

07/09/2018 - 17:03
Education and Research

Since 2007, the EU together with the government of Cambodia and the international community is supporting the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia - ECCC (Khmer Rouge Tribunal).

The ECCC has provided a measure of accountability for the crimes committed under the Khmer Rouge. It has given both victims and perpetrators a chance to hear, put on record their testimony and seek justice to the victims.  The EU support also fosters the country's current reconciliation process and help healing traumas suffered by the Cambodian population under the Khmer Rouge regime.

Total Cost (EUR): 19 900 000.00

EU contracted amount (EUR): 19 900 000.00

Duration: January 2015 - December 2020

Implementing organisation: UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR PROJECT SERVICES

Funding Instrument: Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI)

Benefitting zone:

 

STORY: App-Learning on Khmer Rouge History

 

"I have always been curious to know about my history, now I have an easy tool to help me understand it."

Ms. Nari Son from the University of Cambodia

 

CONTEXT

The Communist Party of Kampuchea (CPK), also known as the Khmer Rouge (KR) ruled Cambodia from April, 1975, until January 1979. The Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot began the vicious four-year regime by declaring 1975 “Year Zero” in the country, and isolated the country from the global community. Under Democratic Kampuchea (DK), everyone was deprived of their basic rights. People were not allowed to go outside their cooperative and the regime would not allow anyone to gather and hold discussions. The traditional family structures were dismantled, and showing emotions was prohibited. Approximately between 1.8 to 2 million people died due to the harsh living conditions or were executed. The genocide ended and was disclosed to the world after the fall of the regime in 1979 following the military intervention of Vietnam.

OBJECTIVES

  • The objective of this project is to educate young Cambodians on Khmer Rouge history by using an innovative multimedia application consisting of accurate and standardized information validated by Cambodian and international experts of Khmer Rouge history.
  • The project also aims to raise awareness about justice, human rights and peace, fostering inter-generational dialogue between Khmer Rouge survivors and youth.

RESULTS

  • Films, photos, media articles, text documents, music and audio files have been selected and produced by Bophana Center's team composed of writers, archivists, audio-visual technicians’ graphic designers and IT experts under the supervision of the Khmer Rouge history experts, and compiled in the form of a smart device application, which is one of the most user-friendly and sharable interfaces for Cambodian youth, the core target beneficiary of the project.
  • Approximately 100 history teachers of high school have been trained on the ‘App-Learning on Khmer Rouge History’ and the app was introduced to the younger generation in High School and Universities of Phnom Penh.
  • An exhibition and presentation of the 'App-Learning on Khmer Rouge History' was organised at Toul Sleng Genocide Museum as they are partners to reach out the international audience.
  • Next step will be to take the project to the rural areas – targeting village schools, colleges and community centers. We will share the second round of update after completion of the second phase

TESTIMONY

Cambodians who have tested the application

Under Democratic Kampuchea (DK), everyone was deprived of their basic rights. People were not allowed to go outside their cooperative and the regime would not allow anyone to gather and hold discussions. The traditional family structures were dismantled, and showing emotions was prohibited. Approximately between 1.8 to 2 million people died due to the harsh living conditions or were executed. Those especially targeted by the regime included intellectuals, city residents, minority people such as the Cham and many of their own soldiers and party members, who were accused of being traitors. The genocide ended and was disclosed to the world after the fall of the regime in 1979 following the military intervention of Vietnam.

Since 2007, the EU together with the government of Cambodia and the international community is supporting the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (Khmer Rouge Tribunal). The ECCC has provided a measure of accountability for the crimes committed under the Khmer Rouge. It has given both victims and perpetrators a chance to hear, put on record their testimony and seek justice to the victims. The EU support also fosters the country's current reconciliation process and help healing traumas suffered by the Cambodian population under the Khmer Rouge regime.

"The new generation of Cambodia is entitled to know about the difficult past their ancestors have encountered. I am happy this application was developed and now up and running to make us understand about our history"   -  stated by Mr. Dim Sovannarom, Public Affairs of ECCC, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

"Khmer Rouge ideology did not mention about killing. Why Khmer Rouge killed innocent people?" says a student from Phnom Penh University.

LEARN MORE

FACTS AND FIGURES

4 videos and 1 App learning released

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