Delegation of the European Union
to the United Nations - New York

EU Supports Programmes Aimed at Educating Next Generation about Anticorruption

18/01/2019 - 08:59
Democracy and Human Rights

EU supports programmes in Armenia, such as “Next Generation: Anti-Corruption Game and Cartoon” dedicated to engaging 12-18 year old in the fight against the many forms of corruption through an engaging mobile game, as well as to giving talented recent graduates the opportunity to apply their skills to their first “real world” project.

EU supports programmes in Armenia, such as “Next Generation: Anti-Corruption Game and Cartoon” dedicated to engaging 12-18 year olds in the fight against the many forms of corruption through an engaging mobile game, as well as to giving talented recent graduates the opportunity to apply their skills to their first “real world” project.

Facts & Figures

Implementing organisations: TUMO Center for Creative Technologies

Duration:  24 months | January 2016 – December 2017

Location: Yerevan

Objectives

  • Create an entertaining and well-designed free mobile game that will educate the new generation about the mechanisms and types of corruption, as well as the challenges and the importance of the fight against it.
  • Involve ex-students of TUMO in the creation of their first game creation project, which will bring them experience and inspiration.

Results

  • The game launched on International Anti-Corruption day and is now available for free on AppStore and GooglePlay.
  • “Tales of Neto” has won an award for Best Creative Innovation at the prestigious NICE Award 2017 held in Germany and has participated in a number of international festivals in Georgia, Italy, and elsewhere.

Testimony

Vardan Kemechechyan, the Lead Game Developer says,

“Tales of Neto” game was designed to talk directly to and exactly like its target audience, and children, of course, see everything differently or simply better, with more hope.”

“The adults accept corruption as something inevitable. We’ve tried to encourage children’s active participation in creating change,” Vardan says. “We’ve set the game up, so the protagonist, Sevan, is in the same position as the children: he isn’t himself involved in any corrupt schemes, but he sees the impact of corruption all around him and on him. He isn’t a direct participant, but he tries to solve those issues. The game starts with Sevan fishing in a contaminated pond, and while trying to solve one problem he encounters bigger and more complex problems, finding out how intertwined and ever-changing corruption is.”

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