Delegation of the European Union to the
UN and other international organisations in Geneva

HRC 34 - EU Intervention: Clustered Interactive Dialogue with the Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy and the Special Rapporteur on sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography

Geneva, 07/03/2017 - 16:46, UNIQUE ID: 170307_11
Statements on behalf of the EU

34th Session of the Human Rights Council Geneva, 27 February – 24 March 2017 EU Intervention: Clustered Interactive Dialogue with the Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy and the Special Rapporteur on sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography

Thank you Mr. President,

I have the honour to speak on behalf of the European Union, thanking the Special Rapporteur on the Right to Privacy for his latest report.

Mr Cannactaci,

Your mandate contains a most relevant topic. This Council affirmed that the same rights apply online as offline, including the right to privacy. States agreed that any interference in an individual’s privacy must adhere to the three principles of legality, necessity and proportionality. The right to privacy is important for the realisation of the rights to freedom of expression, to freedom of peaceful assembly and association and for the work of NGOs, human rights defenders and journalists.

We would like to ask: By ensuring the international human rights framework is central to your work, how will you promote a common understanding of that framework to protect rights online and offline, including the right to privacy?

The EU would like to express its appreciation for the work of the Special Rapporteur on the Sale of Children and her thematic report on illegal adoptions. The report confirms that illegal acts have been and continue to be committed in the context of domestic and intercountry adoption processes.

It is of great concern to the EU that such illegal acts and illicit practices are connected to shortcomings and malfunctions of the child protection system, exploited by criminal elements, often accompanying abduction, sale of, and trafficking in children, in violation of child rights norms and principles. Reports of involvement and participation of State officials in such illegal activities add another layer of concern.

To ensure the best interests of the child, national child protection systems should increase support to vulnerable families, and establish adequate birth registration mechanisms. The protection of children victims of armed conflict and natural disasters, most vulnerable to becoming victims of illegal adoption, requires special attention and effective systems. We urge all States to ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child and its three Optional Protocols, and to live up to their responsibilities to end illegal acts, pursue accountability, and ensure redress for victims of illegal adoptions.

Madame de Boer-Buquicchio,

Could you elaborate on how the mechanism of enhanced cooperation among and between receiving countries and countries of origin suggested in your report can work best? And could you share more details about the international body of experts on transnational justice and illegal adoptions?

Thank you. 

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