Publication: From early warning to early action?


People looking for survivors

© David Sauveur / Agence VU

From early warning to early action?

The debate on the enhancement of the EU's Crisis Response capability continues

Gaza City.
Firestone rubber tree plantation. In terms of natural resources, Liberia is one of West Africa"s richest countries. Before the war, Firestone was Liberia"s main source of income along with diamonds, copper, iron ore and timber.
Adela Mujić, 20 years. "I remember everything, but please don"t ask, I don"t like to talk about it. I"ve never cried".
I returned to the hospital after a week in the Delta area and entered an empty hospital room. Sunita had died that morning. In her village, by the side of the road that would eventually lead her to her final resting place, relatives grieve by her corpse.
Hidden among the trees, Hmong huts in the morning mist.
Landscape of central Ramadi. Ramadi is still a battlefield for the coalition forces.
The roofs of the buildings in the centre of Cairo are occupied by a destitute population. It is the result of a massive population growth and a rural exodus which suffocate the city of 17 million inhabitants.
On the road between Band-Al-Amir and Bamyan, a wreck of a Russian tank.

Table of contents

Foreword and Introduction

Foreword by the EC Commissioner for External Relations pdf - 40 KB [40 KB] PDF
By Benita Ferrero-Waldner
Acknowledgements pdf - 33 KB [33 KB] PDF
By
Introduction pdf - 90 KB [90 KB] PDF
By Andrea Ricci

Part 1: Creating Partnership in Peacebuilding

The Global conflict Barometer pdf - 251 KB [251 KB] PDF
By Nicolas Schwank and Lotta Mayer
Photo Reportage Gaza booms - Summer Rain pdf - 2 MB [2 MB] PDF
By Steve Iuncker
Gaza City.
In the city of Gaza, money is missing. The rubbish is not being picked up anymore. There is no petrol left for the garbage trucks.
At night, at Al Bureij refugee camp - one of the longest resisting camps of the Gaza strip, after a F16 bombing.
A woman wearing a Hamas cap during a demonstration at the Jabalya camp in favour of the Hezbollah firing against Israel.
Waiting for a cab.
Following to the destruction of Nessirat bridge by a F16 bombing, the travellers must walk on both sides of the bridge, until the "traxs" rebuild a road to skirt round the bridge.
In Beit-Hanoun refugee camp, Al-Aqsa soldiers watch over the main road, which has been mined.
Leader of the Al-Aqsa fighters in Al-Bureij camp, just before a F16 bombing of our position.
Soldier at the funeral of one of his comrades in arms.
A group of men under a tent in Khan-Ynounes camp.
A soldier at the funeral of one of his comrades in arms.
In Beit-Hanoun camp, funeral of Ahmed Shaheen, 23, shaheed of the Al-Aqsa brigade (Fatah military wing). The body is carried to the cemetery on a military truck. The boy was killed in a minibus after a F16 attack.
In the camp of Beit-Hanoun, a child mourns for Ahmed Shaheen, 23, shaheed of the Al Aqusa brigade (military arm of the Fatah), who died in a minibus after a F16 rocket attack.
In Beit-Hanoun camp, a woman is crying at the funerals of her brother Ahmed Shaheen, 23, a shaheed of the Al-Aqsa brigade (Fatah army wing), killed in a mini bus after a F16 attack.
From early warning to early action - Developing the EU'sresponse to crisis and longer-term threats pdf - 69 KB [69 KB] PDF
By Benita Ferrero Waldner
Challenges for the EU in conflict prevention and peace building pdf - 84 KB [84 KB] PDF
By Martti Ahtisaari
Foreseeing conflict pdf - 87 KB [87 KB] PDF
By Johan Galtung
Interview - Human security is the key factor pdf - 73 KB [73 KB] PDF
By Angelika Beer
Interview - A European Perspective of crisis response pdf - 72 KB [72 KB] PDF
By Eneko Landaburu
Interview - Assistance in conflict must promote solution pdf - 72 KB [72 KB] PDF
By Marc Otte
Crossing the lines pdf - 91 KB [91 KB] PDF
By Shelley Anderson
Interview - Light the darkness pdf - 61 KB [61 KB] PDF
By Marguerite Barankitse
Photo reportage - After paradise pdf - 4 MB [4 MB] PDF
By Rip Hopkins
Firestone rubber tree plantation. In terms of natural resources, Liberia is one of West Africa"s richest countries. Before the war, Firestone was Liberia"s main source of income along with diamonds, copper, iron ore and timber.
One of the 350,000 Liberian refugees living in the Ivory Coast.
Ministry of Health. Children play in front of the half-completed "new" Ministry of Health, where 470 displaced families have taken refuge.
African Plaza Hotel. Some 320 displaced families live in the shell of what used to be one of the most expensive hotels in Liberia.
Palm oil production is one of the main sources of income for the local population.
Mamba Checkpoint in the capital, Saturday evening. A boy is mistreated by ECOMOG soldiers.
A displaced person demonstrates his wish to fly from Liberia.
Repatriation to the countryside of some of the 700,000 displaced living in Monrovia. Of 2.5 million Liberians, an estimated 150,000-200,000 have been killed and nearly 1.5 million displaced or living as refugees in neighbouring countries.
Save the Children funds a rehabilitation centre for child fighters. Franklin was a member of the NPFL (National Patriotic Front of Liberia). Today, aged 7, he suffers from psychological trauma brought on by the horror of the fighting.
Save the Children funds a rehabilitation centre for child fighters. Boxing practice is intended to help the boys vent their anger and frustration.
Save the Children funds a rehabilitation centre for child fighters. Participation in group games is encouraged during the SCF rehabilitation programme. Ex-fighters learn to become children again.
Save the Children funds a rehabilitation centre for child fighters. Play time: a sack race. Participation in group games is encouraged during the rehabilitation programme.
Save the Children funds a rehabilitation centre for child fighters. Every child has an allotment where they can grow vegetables. The produce is then sold to the centre, giving the children a small income.

Part 2: Crisis Response — Mediation and Peacekeeping

Interview - Bridging the gap pdf - 75 KB [75 KB] PDF
By Christian Berger
A strategic peacbuilding partnership - from early warning by civil society to early response by the European Union pdf - 87 KB [87 KB] PDF
By Jos de la Haye
Report on the outcome of the multi-donor initiative pdf - 305 KB [305 KB] PDF
By Stefanie Dannenmann and Douglas Pattie
Photo reportage - post-war trauma and pain in Bosnia-Herzegovina pdf - 2 MB [2 MB] PDF
By Isabelle Eshraghi
Adela Mujić, 20 years. "I remember everything, but please don"t ask, I don"t like to talk about it. I"ve never cried".
Azemina Ademović, age 41. "In my village there lived 57 men, only 7 survived. Back in 1993 my husband was hurt by an exploding shell. Being wounded saved his life, otherwise… he would not have been among us now".
Kadira Mešanović, age 42. "The worst moments, you can never wipe them from your mind. It is always the same memories that haunt you, always the same".
Tima Hajdarivić, 43 years. "I can"t get rid of those three months (of rape). They took me everywhere they went, from the one house to the other. I had to go to the Kochevo hospital and had all my sexual organs removed. My life as a woman is over".
Rajiba Beganović, age 44. "When I entered the house. I recognised my mother in law because of her dress, her head had been separated from her body. I fainted".
Rusmira Beganović, 49 years. "I went to Tuzla. I recognised the brown shoes of my husband, the ones you would get when you went to war. They were nicknamed "the shoes of death"… When I saw his shoes, I knew he would never come back again".
Rejha Jusić, age 51. "Two years ago my son was found in a mass grave near Zvornik. Only I know how to bear this burden".
Hamida Hukić, age 53. "I"ve seen quite some bodies in front of a house, they had cut-throat the people. They had cut the head off with an axe. It was at dawn. I can still see the axes".
Hajrija Beganović, age 53. "I held my son close to me, they took him, they pushed him. They only wanted to ask some questions, they said. Ever since I am mad, I cannot lose this image, I cannot forget it… I do not dare to live one day without medication".
Rujika Aljič, age 67. "In front of the bus in Potocari, a Tchetnik pointed a gun at my husband and arrested him. In a film made by the Serbs, which was broadcast on TV, I recognised him. I had to cry".
Timka Karišik, age 83. "They never found one single body. Maybe they"ve been burnt".
Hadžira Orić, age 28. "My husband is a survivor, a survivor of the massacre. His life has lost all sense. My husband drinks. I can"t stand it any longer".
Interview - Earning each step pdf - 57 KB [57 KB] PDF
By Miroslav Lajcak
Interview - Preserving Status quo is dangerous pdf - 74 KB [74 KB] PDF
By Peter Semneby
Civilian peacekeeping pdf - 103 KB [103 KB] PDF
By Christine Schweitzer
Creating comprehensive action in peacbuilding - SHIFT pdf - 61 KB [61 KB] PDF
By Kalle Liesinen
Unintended consequences of peacekeeping pdf - 125 KB [125 KB] PDF
By Cedric de Coning, Chiyuki Aoi and Ramesh Thakur
Photo reportage - Women at war pdf - 2 MB [2 MB] PDF
By Philip Blenkinsop
I returned to the hospital after a week in the Delta area and entered an empty hospital room. Sunita had died that morning. In her village, by the side of the road that would eventually lead her to her final resting place, relatives grieve by her corpse.
The road out of Nepalgunj to Bardiya is scarred by Maoist ambush sites. This particular blast claimed the lives of two women.
Policewomen stand with batons ready, during anti-monarchy demonstrations.
Royal Nepalese Army (RNA) women recruits outside of their Kathmandu barracks. This represents the second batch of female recruits into the RNA.
RNA recruit, Karki Puspa, age 20. "My husband, Karki Jeevan (age 20), was killed by Maoists, ten months after we were married. I joined the army to fulfil my husband"s dream of saving the nation. We are not scared to be ambushed. We will fight."
RNA recruit, Shrestha Ram Kumari, age 20. "My husband, Shresthaa Rambahadur (age 26), was ambushed by Maoists while on patrol in Shinduli Bhadrakali 15 months ago."
Comrade Rojana, age 19. "I have seen women being beaten by security forces at a religious fair. Nirmala (another female Maoist combatant) and I were in the cultural team and decided to join the armed movement together."
Comrade Nirmala, age 19, Chetri from the Mid-west hills "I joined the cultural wing of the movement when I was 16 years old. My uncle was in a cultural team and was sheltering in a village when he was killed by RNA troops two years ago.
Comrade Bargiya, age 20, of Taru ethnicity. "I have participated in one raid, numerous encounters and five ambushes. I am not sure how many people were killed by my bullets but I am sure they died. Those I have killed deserved to be killed".
RNA recruit, Tharu Mina Kumari, age 20. "My husband, Tharu Patiram (age 23) was killed in an ambush while patrolling in the Chitwan area. I will marry again after the war if I can find a good man."
Comrade Rekha, age 19. "I joined the Communist Party of Nepal three years ago. My brother has been with the RNA for the last six years. I don"t want to meet him because if I am in a position to kill him on the battlefield, I will kill him."
Arms and the girl pdf - 54 KB [54 KB] PDF
By Shelley Anderson
Streamlining of media as a CFSP instrument pdf - 78 KB [78 KB] PDF
By Bent Norby Bonde
Interview - Tuned into Sierra Leone pdf - 71 KB [71 KB] PDF
By Ambrose James
Media coverage on the tsunami in Asia vs the earthquake in Pakistan pdf - 63 KB [63 KB] PDF
By Media Tenor
Mediation as an instrument for conflict prevention and crise response pdf - 61 KB [61 KB] PDF
By Antje Herrberg
Interview - mediation based on confidence and friendship pdf - 56 KB [56 KB] PDF
By Mario Giro
Photo reportage - Hmong secret war continues, Laos pdf - 3 MB [3 MB] PDF
By Philip Blenkinsop
Hidden among the trees, Hmong huts in the morning mist.
Hong Pao Yang, age 71. Fought with the CIA during the secret war from 1967-1975.
We continue to approach… and this sea of humanity crumbles like a wave, crying, wailing and wailing at us (hands clasped together). We are the first white faces any of them have seen since they were abandoned by the Americans 27 years ago.
The sea of faces that greets us is void of any expression of hope. In the centre of the image, Bang Yang, age 14, cries. Her husband, age 15, Koua Pao Lee, was killed a few days before their child was born. Yet she holds no monopoly on grief.
Malnutrition
Tdu Bi Xion, age 18, received shrapnel wounds in the chest from a B-41 rocket attack in December 2000 and had his left hand crippled by an AK-47 round in a separate incident.
Sai Tong Wang, age 30, with his son, Tdu Tong, age 6. Tdu Tong was wounded in the face by a shot fired from an AK-47 on 1 November 1999.
Yaeng Hua is 9 years old and severely traumatized. His parents were both killed during a mortar attack and as well as the shrapnel injuries he sustained, his jaw was broken by an AK-47 round.
Pbai Lo, age 28, shot in the neck by an AK-47 round on 19 November 2001. Only four days earlier her husband, Teng Kong Wa, lost his leg to a landmine.
Father and son.
Teng Kong Wha, age 40, with his son, Wha Hua, age 7. Lost his right leg to a landmine on 23 November 2001, four days after his wife, Pbai Lo, was shot in the neck and leg by AK-47 rounds.
Three generations of resistance, left to right: Song Der, age 80 (fought with the French), his son, Sai Tua, age 40, who fought with the CIA, and two of his sons, Shua Yung, age 26, and Sai, age 10, who now face the Laos Communist troops.
A Hmong freedom fighter with his son at their hidden camp.
On the afternoon prior to our departure, Commander Moua Toua Ther with assembled villagers delivers a message and pleas to the USA and the international community.
A Hmong woman with her children.
On the afternoon prior to our departure, the whole village gathers to send their collective voice to the governments of the world for their prayers to be heard and for salvation. They know that we are their only chance for survival.
Key issues concerning the Hmong people in Laos - Thailand pdf - 64 KB [64 KB] PDF
By Carl Bjorkman
From managing the emergency to consolidating the stability pdf - 74 KB [74 KB] PDF
By Detlef W. Karioth
Interview - People are tired of war - supporting the peace process in Northern Uganda pdf - 87 KB [87 KB] PDF
By Oloo Otieno
Interview - No development without security - nonviolent peaceforce in Mindanao pdf - 65 KB [65 KB] PDF
By Atif Hameed
Swords into ploughshares pdf - 128 KB [128 KB] PDF
By Gwinyayi Albert Dzinesa
Photo reportage - Ramadi, Iraq - Alvaro Ybarra Zavala pdf - 2 MB [2 MB] PDF
By Alvaro Ybarra Zavala
Landscape of central Ramadi. Ramadi is still a battlefield for the coalition forces.
A former member of the militia, now member of the local police of Ramadi.
Iraqi police recruits line up to be screened at Camp Defender, an Iraqi Army base linked to the Americans" Camp Ramadi. These recruits will become part of a new quick reaction police team called the Emergency Response Unit.
Ahmet, a former Suni militia man, now works for the special unit of the Iraqi police in the Karrada neighbourhood in Baghdad.
Policemen from the special unit of the Karrada neighbourhood inside their base before going out on patrol.
Iraqi police recruits line up to be screened at Camp Defender, an Iraqi Army base linked to the Americans" Camp Ramadi. These recruits will become part of a new quick reaction police team called the Emergency Response Unit.
Lieutenant Larson and Iraqi chief of the Iraqi special police of Karranda neighbourhood preparing a mission.
Checkpoint on the road to Ramadi from Baghadad. (Iraqi policemen are ex-members of a local Suni militia in Ramadi).
Police unit searching a house in their own Karrada neighbourhood in Baghdad with Bravo Company, second platoon of the first cavalry division, from Fort Hood, Texas, USA.
Policemen from the special unit of the Karrada neighbourhood inside their base before going out on patrol.
Police unit searching a house in their own Karrada neighbourhood in Baghdad with Bravo Company, second platoon of the first cavalry division, from Fort Hood, Texas, USA
During a house search by Iraqi police and American forces in the Karrada neighbourhood of Baghdad, a policeman grabs a little girl while her father is searched.
Iraqi police and US army working together in a police station in Ramadi.
Checkpoint on the road into Ramadi from Baghadad. (Iraqi policemen are ex-members of a local Suni militia in Ramadi).
Major Megan Mc Lung, 43, from Coupeville, is taking a picture of the son of one of the most important tribal families in Ramadi, the new ally of the US army in Ramadi. One hour after this picture was taken, Major Megan Mc Lung died in an ambush.

Part 3: Natural Disaster and Resource War

Part 4: Trans-regional threats, intelligible warnings and intelligent intelligence

Part 5: Annex

Annex pdf - 112 KB [112 KB] PDF
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