Visa

The EU Member States represented in Malawi handle visa applications for Malawian and other citizens. Which Embassy you should contact will depend on which EU Member State you intend to visit, but also on your intended length of stay. Since 5 April 2010 the EU applies a common Visa Code which covers visas issued for the purpose of short stays.

Malawi is among the countries whose nationals are required to be in possession of a visa when crossing the external borders of the EU Member States, with the exception of the Republic of Ireland. The EU Member States represented in or accredited to Malawi handle visa applications for Malawian nationals or other citizens residing in Malawi. Which Embassy you should contact depends on which EU Member State you intend to visit, but also on your intended length of stay. 'Short-term visas' are for stays up to 90 days, 'long-term visas' for stays that exceed 90 days.

Malawian nationals and other citizens residing in Malawi who wish to apply for a short- or long-term visa to the UK, Ireland or Germany should contact the British High Commission to Malawi, the Irish Embassy in Lilongwe, or the German Embassy in Lilongwe, respectively.
Short-term visa applications for Austria, Belgium, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal and Spain are handled by the German Embassy in Lilongwe.

Short-term-visa applications for Denmark, Finland and Sweden are handled by the Norwegian Embassy in Lilongwe.

For visas to all other EU Member States you have to contact the relevant EU Member State's Honorary Consul in Malawi or the competent Embassy in a neighbouring country.

EU legislation in relation to visas for the purpose of 'long stays' remains a matter of national competence. Therefore, if you are planning to stay longer than 90 days, you have to contact the relevant EU Member State's Honorary Consul in Malawi or the competent Embassy in a neighbouring country.

EU Visa Code

On 5 April 2010 the EU Visa Code came into force. The Visa Code covers visas issued for the purpose of short stays. It gathers into a single document all legal provisions governing decisions on visas. It increases transparency, develops legal security, and ensures equal treatment of applicants while harmonising rules and practices for the 'Schengen States' and its associated states.

In accordance with the Schengen Agreement of 1985, the Schengen area represents a territory where the free movement of persons is guaranteed. The Schengen States have abolished all internal borders in favour of a single external border. Common rules and procedures are applied with regard to visas for short stays, asylum requests and border controls.

Simultaneously, to guarantee security within the Schengen area, cooperation and coordination between police services and judicial authorities have been stepped up. The UK and Ireland (together with Bulgaria, Cyprus and Romania) are among those EU members that do not partake fully in the Schengen cooperation. Conversely, three non-EU members (Norway, Iceland and Switzerland) partake in Schengen via an agreement drawn up for this purpose.