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01/11/2014

In partnership with women

Informal Task Force on Women, Peace and Security

18 August 2014

Exchange of information and best practices

The EU Comprehensive Approach on Women, Peace and Security stipulates that an exchange of information between the different actors engaged in the issue should be encouraged. With this in mind, the Informal Task Force on UNSCR 1325 was set up in 2009 and meets regularly in Brussels since. The Task Force aims at increasing inter-institutional coordination and promoting a coherent approach to gender-related issues. It is composed of staff working on both gender equality and security issues in the European External Action Service (EEAS), the Council Secretariat and Commission services, and is open to EU Member State participation. It meets regularly with the EU Special Representative on Human Rights, the Crisis Management and Planning Directorate (CMPD) and the Civilian Planning and Conduct Capability (CPCC) of the EEAS. The Task Force also occasionally consults with civil society organisations. International organizations based in Brussels, like UN organisations and NATO, are invited to Task Force meetings.

An open exchange among EU Member States on national implementation of Resolution 1325 is organised once a year in view of sharing best practices and identifying joint interests, taking particularly into account difficulties encountered and lessons identified for the future. This exchange also provides a platform for civil society representatives from conflict-affected regions as well as the EU to deliver statements on their priorities and progress made at the local and national levels related to the implementation of UNSCRs 1325, 1820 and related resolutions.

 

The UN Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security 

Adopted on 31 October 2000, United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 is the first Security Council resolution to address the disproportionate and unique impact of armed conflict on women. UNSCR 1325 reinforces prior international and regional legal commitments and conventions relevant to women, peace and security and establishes a series of new principles. It stresses the importance of women’s equal and full participation as active agents in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, peace negotiations, peace-building, peacekeeping, humanitarian response and in post-conflict reconstruction. It calls on member states to ensure women’s equal participation and full involvement in all efforts for the maintenance and promotion of peace and security. It urges all actors to increase the participation of women and incorporate gender perspectives in all United Nations peace and security efforts, including Demobilisation, Disarmament and Reintegration (DDR) and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

On 19 June 2008, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1820 on sexual violence in conflict, which explicitly links sexual violence as a tactic of war with the maintenance of international peace and security. UNSCR 1820 reinforces Resolution 1325 in recognising that sexual violence is often widespread and systematic and can impede the restoration of international peace and security. The Security Council has now a clear mandate to address Sexual and Gender Based Violence, including through sanctions and training to empower field staff to prevent and respond to these issues. The resolution highlights that sexual violence perpetrated by arms bearers against civilians constitutes a war crime and demands parties to armed conflict to immediately take appropriate measures to protect civilians from sexual violence, including training troops and enforcing disciplinary measures.

UN Security Council resolution 1888 (2009) on acts of sexual violence against civilians in armed conflicts: The Resolution specifically mandates peacekeeping missions to protect women and children from rampant sexual violence during armed conflict, as it requested the Secretary-General to appoint a special representative to coordinate a range of mechanisms to fight the crime. To enhance the effectiveness of measures for the protection of women and children by peacekeeping missions, the Council decided to identify women’s protection advisers among gender advisers and human rights protection units. Other provisions of the text included the strengthening of monitoring and reporting on sexual violence, the retraining of peacekeepers, national forces and police, and calls to boost the participation of women in peacebuilding and other post-conflict processes.

UN Security Council resolution 1889 (2009) calls for a wide range of measures to strengthen the participation of women at all stages of peace processes, focusing on the period after peace agreements have been reached. It urges Member States, United Nations bodies, donors and civil society to ensure that women’s protection and empowerment is taken into account during post-conflict needs assessment and planning, and factored into subsequent funding and programming. It also calls on all those involved in the planning for disarmament, demobilization and integration programmes, in particular, to take into account the needs of women and girls associated with armed groups, as well as the needs of their children.

UNSCR 1960 (2010) reminds all states to comply with international law and for leaders to demonstrate commitment to prevent sexual violence, combat impunity and uphold accountability, as inaction would send the wrong message. Perpetrators of war crimes and genocide had to prosecuted, emphasising the primary responsibility of states to respect and ensure human rights of people within their territory. The resolution notes that ending impunity is essential if a society is to recover from conflict, and in this regard, there needs to be better access to health care, psychosocial support, legal assistance and the needs of persons with disabilities.

UNSCR 2106 (2013) requests relevant UN entities to assist national authorities in addressing sexual violence, with effective participation of women, in SSR and justice sector reform processes, specifically through training, increasing female recruitment and implementing vetting processes that exclude perpetrators of sexual violence from serving in security institutions.

UNSCR 2122 (2013) puts stronger measures in place for women to participate in all phases of conflict prevention, resolution and recovery, placing the onus of providing them with seats at the peace table on Member States, regional organizations and the United Nations itself.

 

EU Policy Documents

  1. Comprehensive approach to the EU implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1325 and 1820 on women, peace and security pdf - 336 KB [336 KB]
  2. Indicators for the Comprehensive approach to the EU implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1325 and 1820 on women, peace and security pdf - 211 KB [211 KB]
  3. Implementation of UNSCR 1325 as reinforced by UNSCR 1820 in the context of ESDP pdf - 367 KB [367 KB]
  4. Concept on strengthening EU Mediation and Dialogue Capacities pdf - 154 KB [154 KB]
  5. Report on the EU- indicators for the Comprehensive Approach to the EU implementation of the UN Security Council UNSCR 1325 & 1820 on women, peace and security pdf - 486 KB [486 KB]
  6. Second Report on the EU- indicators for the Comprehensive Approach to the EU implementation of the UN Security Council UNSCR 1325 & 1820 on women, peace and security pdf - 209 KB [209 KB]

UN Policy Documents

  1. UN Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security pdf - 36 KB [36 KB]
  2. UN Security Council resolution 1820 (2008) on acts of sexual violence against civilians in armed conflicts pdf - 38 KB [38 KB]
  3. UN Security Council resolution 1888 (2009) on acts of sexual violence against civilians in armed conflicts pdf - 49 KB [49 KB]
  4. UN Security Council resolution 1889 (2009) on women and peace and security pdf - 165 KB [165 KB]
  5. UN Security Council resolution 1960 (2010) on women and peace and security pdf - 43 KB [43 KB]
  6. UN Security Council resolution 2106 (2013) on women and peace and security pdf - 45 KB [45 KB]
  7. UN Security Council resolution 2122 (2013) on women and peace and security pdf - 47 KB [47 KB]

 

Minutes of the UNSCR Task Force

  1. Minutes of the UNSCR 1325 Task Force meeting on 23 April 2009 pdf - 143 KB [143 KB]
  2. Minutes of the UNSCR 1325 Task Force meeting on 27 February 2010 pdf - 297 KB [297 KB]
  3. Minutes of the UNSCR 1325 Task Force meeting on 3 October 2011 pdf - 206 KB [206 KB]
  4. Minutes of the UNSCR 1325 Task Force meeting on 23 April 2012 pdf - 82 KB [82 KB]
  5. Minutes of the UNSCR 1325 Task Force meeting on 5 December 2012 pdf - 94 KB [94 KB]
  6. Minutes of the UNSCR 1325 Task Force meeting on 6 November 2013 pdf - 75 KB [75 KB]
  7. Minutes of the UNSCR 1325 Task Force meeting on 28 April 2014 pdf - 54 KB [54 KB]

Reports

  1. Report of the meeting on the elaboration and implementation of UNSCR 1325 National Action Plans, 2 October 2009 pdf - 352 KB [352 KB]
  2. Report of the ESDP Gender Advisors and Focal Points Meeting, 9-10 November 2009 pdf - 243 KB [243 KB]
  3. First CSO Consultation of the Task Force on 29 March 2010 pdf - 119 KB [119 KB]
  4. Report- EU Member States annual meeting on UNSCR 1325, Peace negotiations and mediation, Brussels, 14 June 2012 pdf - 66 KB [66 KB]
  5. EU Statement on UNSCR 1325 implementation, OSCE Forum for Security Co-operation, 8 May 2013 pdf - 40 KB [40 KB]
  6. Factsheet – EEAS Mediation Support Project – Knowledge Product pdf - 5 MB [5 MB]
  7. EU Member States annual meeting on UNSCR 1325, Transitional justice and gender: reducing impunity, 27 May 2013 pdf - 398 KB [398 KB]
  8. EU input to the Secretary-General’s 2013 report to the Security Council on women and peace and security pdf - 427 KB [427 KB]
  9. EU input to the Secretary-General’s 2014 report to the Security Council on women and peace and security pdf - 688 KB [688 KB]
  10. EU Member States annual meeting on UNSCR 1325, Linking post-2015 to women, peace and security & 15 years of UNSCR 1325 – looking ahead to 2015, Brussels, 4 July 2014 pdf - 398 KB [398 KB]

Reports by EU MS

Reporting by third parties (International Organisations, NGOs)

  1. EPLO: Joining the Dots: from national to European Level implementation of UNSCR 1325 pdf - 399 KB [399 KB]
  2. EPLO: UNSCR 1325 in Europe: 20 case studies of implementation pdf - 848 KB [848 KB]
  3. Gender, Peace and Security in the European Union’s Field Missions, Folke Bernadotte Academy, 2013 zip - 2 MB [2 MB]

 

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